University of Stirling

Development and External Affairs

Media

 

News Archive

April 2007

UK's First International Dementia Conference

“‘Damned if you do - Damned if you don't’: Judgements and Decisions in Healthcare”

New All Female Research Link With Pakistan

Training Courses Prove Good Catch for Rural Industry

Principal's Music: From Mancini to Morricone - Wednesday 18 April

Conservationists Enlist the Public's Help to Ease the Plight of the Bumblebee

Coming soon to the BBC…Nursing A Dream

International News Agency Teams Up With Stirling

Cancer Care Research Centre Open Its Doors

UK's First International Dementia Conference

Date released: Monday 2 April 2007

The University of Stirling’s Dementia Services Development Centre (DSDC) is holding the UK’s first ever international conference on dementia 3-4 April 2007 entitled: ‘Citizenship: Responding to the Challenge of Dementia’.

The conference, designed for a range of dementia practitioners from day care managers and clinical psychologists to physiotherapists and speech therapists, has sold out indicating the level of interest in the field.

DSDC Director, Professor June Andrews said: “A person should have rights to make choices, opportunities to express individuality and to participate in everyday life experiences. The challenge is, how can this be achieved given the progressive nature of dementia?”

Organisers say the conference will focus on real issues, concentrating on the following four perspectives:


• Clinical Matters
• Service Responses
• Working with the Person
• Practice Change and Learning


Leading economist, Professor David Bell of the University of Stirling will address the conference on the topic of free personal care.

The Dementia Services Development Centre will also launch an art exhibition, including a number of works by people with dementia, in its Frank Hitchman Gallery at 1pm on Tuesday 3 April. The exhibition runs until Thursday 17 May and can be viewed Monday to Friday 9am to 4.30pm.

Lesley Wilkinson (née Pollock)
Media Relations Manager
(01786) 467058


For further information:

 
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Professor June Andrews

University of Stirling

Stirling

FK9 4LA
Scotland

UK

telephone

Tel: +44 (0)1786 467740 or

+44 ( 0)7906 696341


“‘Damned if you do - Damned if you don't’: Judgements and Decisions in Healthcare”

Date released: Tuesday 10 April 2007

Professor Len Dalgleish of the University of Stirling’s Department of Nursing and Midwifery will give his inaugural professorial public lecture on Wednesday 11 April, 4-5pm, in Lecture Theatre A5, Cottrell Building.

The topic of his lecture will be “‘Damned if you do - Damned if you don't’: Judgements and decisions in healthcare”. The focus will be on decisions to take action or not and the assessments or judgments underlying them.

Professor Dalgleish said: “One of the decisions we are researching is the decision to transfer a woman in labour from a community midwife unit to a hospital. Midwives are confronted by the dilemma of “damned if you do – damned if you don’t”. If they decide to transfer they may be wrong; if they don’t transfer they may be wrong. They cannot avoid the possibility of error.”

A general model for assessment (judgment) and decision making (the GADM model) will be outlined. It assumes that information from the current situation is formed into an assessment (or judgment). It links assessments and decisions by the idea that if an assessment of the situation is above a person’s threshold, then action is taken to manage the situation. The model separates the assessment of the situation from the decision to take action. It accounts for disagreement in decision making. The application of the model has implications for both practice and policy and these will be outlined.

Lesley Wilkinson (née Pollock)
Media Relations Manager
(01786) 467058


For further information:

 
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Suzie Huggins

University of Stirling

Stirling

FK9 4LA
Scotland

UK

telephone

Tel: +44 (01786) 466054


New All Female Research Link With Pakistan

Date released: Wednesday 11 April 2007

Funding worth £30,000 has been awarded to an all female research project between the University of Stirling’s Institute of Aquaculture and the University of Karachi’s Centre of Excellence in Marine Biology. The award was made as part of the British Council and the Higher Education Commission of Pakistan’s Higher Education links programme.

The three year project has the aim of strengthening teaching and research in shellfish aquaculture. As part of the programme, Dr Zarrien Ayub and Dr Ghazala Siddiqui will spend a month at Stirling developing their teaching and research capabilities in aspects of shrimp and bivalve (oyster, mussel or scallop) culture. Stirling researcher Dr Janet Brown will also visit their facilities in Pakistan.

Dr Brown said, “It makes sense for female academics to be involved in developing shellfish aquaculture since employment prospects in the shellfish industry in Pakistan are often uniquely attractive to women, particularly in culturing bivalves such as oysters. Shrimp farming can also provide good job opportunities in the processing of shrimp.”

Lesley Wilkinson (née Pollock)
Media Relations Manager
(01786) 467058

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Dr Janet Brown

University of Stirling

Stirling

FK9 4LA
Scotland

UK

telephone

Tel: +44 (01786) 467894


Training Courses Prove Good Catch for Rural Industry

Date released: Wednesday 11 April 2007

The University of Stirling’s world-class centre for research and development in aquaculture has launched a new range of training programmes targeted at people working in the rural aquaculture industry. The Institute of Aquaculture has updated the training it offers to provide a wide selection of credited short courses, allowing people to boost their skills without a large time commitment.

Dr Lindsay Pollock of the Institute of Aquaculture said: “Up-to-date training is central to maintaining Scotland’s competitiveness in an increasingly globalised industry. Our flexible training courses are designed to fit around the lifestyles of those working in aquaculture, particularly rural workers, who want to learn but can’t afford to take time out for longer periods of study.”

Two week courses are available in vocational subjects such as: Sustainable Aquaculture, Aquaculture Nutrition, Aquaculture and the Environment, Aquaculture Systems, Aquaculture Development, Aquaculture Business Management, Aquatic Veterinary Studies and Aquatic Pathobiology.

Dr Pollock added: “Our novel two-week teaching approach means that credit can be gained towards a Postgraduate Certificate, Postgraduate Diploma or Master’s Degree. All our modules are also available for Continuing Professional Development, so professional training needs can be met with the option of returning at a later stage to complete an academic programme and gain a University qualification. For those who need even greater flexibility, we also offer distance learning courses such as our postgraduate Certificate in Aquatic Animal Health and Master’s in Aquatic Resources Development.”

The Institute of Aquaculture has successfully met industry and academic needs for the last 35 years with its provision of high quality and relevant Aquaculture teaching and training. Teaching is carried out in state-of-the-art classrooms and laboratories by highly experienced academic staff.

Dr James Deverill, Business Development Manager at EWOS Ltd – global leaders in feed for farmed fish – said: “The introduction of these short aquaculture CPD courses is a welcome initiative. Commercial realities require flexible solutions for businesses and it's great to see this kind of flexibility being offered by a key centre of aquaculture excellence.'

The benefits of Institute’s training were highlighted by its Director, Professor Randolph Richards: “The Institute is proud of its contribution to the development of global aquaculture. Through our research we have provided the basis for many of the most important scientific advances in aquaculture and our graduates now occupy leading positions in the private and public spheres.”

Lesley Wilkinson (née Pollock)
Media Relations Manager
(01786) 467058

 

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Dr Lindsay Pollock

University of Stirling

Stirling

FK9 4LA
Scotland

UK

telephone

Tel: +44 (01786) 467900


Principal's Music: From Mancini to Morricone - Wednesday 18 April

Date released: Friday 13 April 2007

The next performance in the University of Stirling’s Principal’s Music series will be given by Beaconhurst Woodwind Ensemble. The free public event, entitled From Mancini to Morricone, will take place on Wednesday 18 April 1-1.45pm in the foyer of the MacRobert.

The light-hearted programme of popular classics will include the Dance of the Hours by Ponchielli, as well as more modern classics such as Morricone's theme from The Good, the Bad and the Ugly, and Mancini's Pink Panther theme.


The musicians are all senior pupils from Beaconhurst School, Bridge of Allan. Individually, they have each attained a very high standard of performing, and forming themselves into an ensemble gives them the chance to explore chamber music of all styles - from Baroque to jazz. When not playing together, they are also involved in various orchestras, including the West of Scotland Independent Schools Orchestra, the Falkirk Wind Band and the Beaconhurst Jazz Band.

 

Lesley Wilkinson (née Pollock)
Media Relations Manager
(01786) 467058

 

For further information:

 
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address

Suzie Huggins

University of Stirling

Stirling

FK9 4LA
Scotland

UK

telephone

Tel: +44 (01786) 466054


Conservationists Enlist the Public's Help to Ease the Plight of the Bumblebee

Date released: Monday 16 April 2007

The Bumblebee Conservation Trust (BBCT) at the University of Stirling is calling on the public to help with a national bumblebee survey. BeeWatch 2007 asks people to keep an eye out for the different types and send in records to help produce an up-to-date national distribution map. The Trust also wants people to try installing their own bumblebee nesting boxes to give the creatures somewhere to live.

Many people will be surprised to learn that there are actually 25 different species of bumblebee and six or so of them are still common in people's gardens. However, several species are seriously threatened and three are already nationally extinct.

Ben Darvill, Director of the Bumblebee Conservation Trust, said: "The general public can do a lot to help, by planting cottage garden flowers, and by recording the bumblebees they see. Producing accurate distribution maps is a crucial step in conserving our precious bumblebees. Those wishing to take part in the survey might find the identification guide on the BBCT website useful. Bumblebees can be difficult to identify though, so feel free to take digital photos and email them in – BBCT will identify your bees and let you know what you have."

BBCT is also running a national trial of different bumblebee homes. They are keen to learn whether the commercial boxes (some of which cost £90) are ever used, and want to test a number of much cheaper alternatives. Anyone can take part, even in the smallest gardens. Several different designs are available to try, some you can buy, and others you can easily make for just a few pence. The Trust hopes to hear from gardeners who already own a bumblebee nesting box, and anyone else who is interested in taking part. More information, nest box designs and suggestions for how to get the best out of commercial boxes can be found on the BBCT website (www.bumblebeeconservationtrust.co.uk).

Lesley Wilkinson (née Pollock)
Media Relations Manager
(01786) 467058

For further information:

 
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Ben Darvill

Director

Bumblebee Conservation Trust

University of Stirling

Stirling

FK9 4LA
Scotland

UK

email Email: enquiries@bumblebeeconservationtrust.co.uk

Coming soon to the BBC…Nursing A Dream

Date released: Friday 13 April 2007

The University of Stirling’s Department of Nursing & Midwifery is to star in a two-part documentary to be screened on BBC Two Scotland on Monday 16 April and Monday 23 April at 9pm.

Nursing A Dream charts a year-in-the-life of students studying at the University’s Western Isles campus on the Isle of Lewis as they endure hard work, long hours and high emotions in their journey to become qualified nurses.

Course Director Annetta Smith knows exactly what it takes to make the nursing grade. “You need to be caring,” she says. “It’s a challenging job and if you have that desire when you start the course then that will help to overcome some of the challenges you may face.”

The documentary brings to life the tales of would-be nurses as they discover whether they are cut out for a career in Scotland’s Health Service.

The opening programme covers first year students Norma Macleod, Laura Young and Sandra Morrison as they take their first steps on the wards. While the new starts get to grips with practical nursing, coursework is the second year’s focus. But not everyone copes and after failing her exams, Emma Macdonald’s nursing future seems uncertain.

It is also a critical time for the third years. After nearly three years of studying and long hours working on the wards, students like Rachel Kennedy, need to pass the final hurdle of finding a job knowing that they will be competing against their friends and fellow students.

Also featured are the stories of Katie Tilley who took her young family and left behind her life in Glasgow to study nursing in Stornoway; first year student Shona Shields who witnesses a gruelling hip replacement operation; and mature student Dena Mitchell who, despite having left school without any qualifications, has proved to be a natural nurse.

Head of the Department of Nursing & Midwifery, Professor Tommy Starrs said: “We hope the programmes will encourage more people to consider a career in nursing. The documentary demonstrates the high levels of commitment needed to succeed in becoming a nurse, but also the satisfaction to be derived from such a career choice. We are committed to realising people’s nursing dreams and offer a variety of courses from our three campuses in Stirling, Inverness and Stornoway.”

To find out more about studying to become a nurse or midwife see: www.nm.stir.ac.uk or call: 01786 466345 to find out more.

Lesley Wilkinson (née Pollock)
Media Relations Manager
(01786) 467058

 

For further information:

 
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address

Department of Nursing & Midwifery

University of Stirling

Stirling

FK9 4LA
Scotland

UK

telephone

Tel: +44 (01786) 466345


International News Agency Teams Up With Stirling

Date released: Thursday 19 April 2007

One of the world’s largest international news agencies, Inter-Press Service (IPS) has named the University of Stirling as its academic partner in Europe. IPS is a not-for-profit association and concentrates on covering news from developing countries.

Since 2004 the newsgathering organisation has provided training material for the University’s state-of-the-art journalism students’ newsroom. As part of the partnership, Stirling students will now be offered work placements with the agency across the globe as well as access to its services, training manuals and facilities.

IPS European Director Ramesh Jaura will visit the University on Monday 23 April to meet with staff and students in the departments of Politics and Film & Media Studies. He will also give a free public lecture on News Agenda, Alternative News and the New World Order in Pathfoot Lecture Theatre at 5pm.

Lesley Wilkinson (née Pollock)
Media Relations Manager
(01786) 467058

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Jairo Lugo

University of Stirling

Stirling

FK9 4LA
Scotland

UK

telephone

Tel: +44 (01786) 466226


Cancer Care Research Centre Open Its Doors

Date released: Monday 30 April 2007

The University of Stirling’s Cancer Care Research Centre (CCRC) will open its doors to the public on Wednesday 2 May 2-6pm. The event is an informal opportunity to discover more about the Centre’s work, including its plans for the future.


CCRC was established in October 2003 with the aim of improving cancer care services throughout the UK. There is no other research centre in the UK which looks solely at cancer care from the patient's viewpoint.


The Centre has been setting up patient and carer advisory groups throughout Scotland to find out which areas in cancer care need to be changed for the better; to discover where cancer care services are working and to allow patients and carers to influence the direction of the Centre’s research. Its research focuses on four main areas:


• The impact of cancer on children and families;
• Cancer as a long-term condition;
• Discovering new ways of assessing and managing symptoms that promote the use of self-care (e.g. using mobile phones in innovative ways).
• Understanding the experiences of older people with cancer.


Bill Culbard, who was diagnosed with lung cancer in 2000 - just 15 months after getting married - but has since been given the all clear, is a member of the Stirling Patient and Carer Advisory Group. He said: "Being part of this group has really made me feel like I can make a difference to what research is carried out by the Cancer Care Research Centre. As a group we have even met with the head of cancer at the Scottish Executive to lobby them to take the findings seriously. Attending these meetings is how I use my experience as someone who has survived cancer to try and improve cancer care."


Christine Phillips is a former cancer patient and works alongside CCRC staff as a co-researcher - she was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2001. She has been working with CCRC interviewing Health Board Chief Executives about patient and public involvement. She said: “There is no other research centre in the UK which prioritises cancer care from the patient's viewpoint. To do this successfully means putting patients at the centre of our work. CCRC is unique in its way of working with people affected by cancer - they are not just the "subjects" of the research - but are actively encouraged to guide what research the team do, present findings at conferences and comment on research findings.”

People affected by cancer interested in receiving training on becoming more involved in research are also invited to a meeting at the Cancer Care Research Centre (CCRC), Unit 2, Scion House, Innovation Park, University of Stirling, on Wednesday 16 May at 7pm.

The meeting will be an opportunity for people who are or have been treated for cancer and their family and friends to discuss and put forward ideas on what training CCRC should provide to help people affected by cancer get more involved in the Centre.

Dr Liz Forbat, senior researcher at CCRC, says: “It is essential to involve people who have been affected by cancer - either as patients or relatives/friends of someone with cancer - and make sure we learn from them when we do our research. We know that in the UK as many as one in three people will develop cancer. It is vital that we seek the views of patients and their family/friends’ on how they can get involved in research. We have set up 14 local advisory groups across Scotland to help us to develop our research plans. We regularly speak with members of these groups about their experiences and views of cancer services. The groups advise our research team on what we should be researching and what needs to change in Scottish cancer care.”

For further information contact: cancercare@stir.ac.uk or phone: 01786 849260. Alternatively visit CCRC’s website: www.cancercare.stir.ac.uk

Lesley Wilkinson (née Pollock)
Media Relations Manager
(01786) 467058

For further information:

 
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Dr Liz Forbat

University of Stirling

Stirling

FK9 4LA
Scotland

UK

telephone

Tel: +44 (01786) 849260