University of Stirling

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News Archive

April 2005

Criminology Seminars Continue this Spring

A Weekend of Lindsay Anderson at the MacRobert

Marketing Can be Used to Benefit Public Health

80-Year-Old Graduate Vows to Carry on Learning

The Principal’s Music

Stirling Expert Joins Corporate Homicide Group

MSPs Learn about Good Practice at Stirling

Wanted: Your Views on Cancer Services

Deep Down Scots Want To Be Environmentally Friendly

Independent Audit Under the Spotlight

Stirling's Marketing Comes up Trumps

Stirling Student Makes £3.5k for Red Cross

Rwandan Scholarship Scheme

 

Criminology Seminars Continue this Spring

Date released: Monday 4 April 2005

The Department of Applied Social Science’s Criminology Seminar Series continues this spring.

Wednesday 6 April 4.30-6pm Iris Murdoch Building
Towards a Criminology of Transitional Justice - Professor Kieran McEvoy
Kieran McEvoy is Professor of Law and Transitional Justice and Head of Research at the School of Law, Queens University Belfast. His books include Paramilitary Imprisonment in Northern Ireland, winner of the 2001 British Society of Criminology book of the year award; Crime, Community and Locale and Criminology, Conflict Resolution and Restorative Justice. He is currently writing a monograph entitled Reconstructing Justice: Criminology, Human Rights and Transition from Conflict. His research and practice interests include human rights, restorative justice, prisons, transitional justice, judiciary and the legal profession, conflict resolution and dead bodies.

This paper analyses the impact of the dominance of law and legal scholarship upon the study of transitional justice. The paper argues that the discipline of criminology can challenge some of the more obvious failings of legalism in providing a 'thicker' theory of transitional justice.

Wednesday 13 April 4.30-6pm Common Room, Colin Bell Building
Burning Issues: Young people, fire, carnival and crime - Mike Presdee
Mike Presdee is Director of Criminology at the University of Kent and has written widely on the connections between culture and crime and the new field of Cultural Criminology. He is the author of Cultural Criminology and the Carnival of Crime and co-editor of Cultural Criminology Unleashed.

At the present time 'arson' is one of the fastest growing crime areas. Each week 2 people die in arson attacks whilst 17 schools suffer an arson attack of some sort. Over the last ten years arson attacks on buildings have risen 36 percent and vehicle arson has nearly trebled. Close to 200 cars are burnt every day yet detection rates are only 8 percent compared with 24 percent for all other offences. The social cost of traumatized lives is always difficult to measure but the monetary loss is 2.1 billion pounds a year. Yet fire figures generally are falling, so as we become a more safe society so the legal and illegal continuing carnival of fire continues to rise. This paper looks at the cultural celebration and meaning of fire in contemporary society in trying to understand the meaning and motivations for the festival of fire in everyday life.

Wednesday 4 May 4.30-6pm Common Room, Colin Bell Building
From ‘crime’ to ‘social harm’ – Professor Steve Tombs
Steve Tombs is a Professor of Sociology at Liverpool John Moores University and Chair of the Centre for Corporate Accountability. He has a long-standing interest in the incidence, nature and regulation of corporate crime, and in particular the regulation and management of health and safety at work. Since 1999, Steve has been researching the control of corporate crime in Finland.

The starting point of this talk is a series of long-standing questions for critical criminologists, which can be summarised as what is the theoretical rationale of retaining current definitions and analysis of crime, (criminal) law, and the criminal justice system? The re-emergence of discussions around such questions is related to claims made for an alternative focus, around the notion of ‘social harm’. As a way of furthering these discussions, Steve aims to rehearse several (well-known) criticisms of criminology, propose a number of reasons for a notion of ‘social harm’ than ‘crime’ and sketch out what may be entailed in such a ‘social harm’ approach.

Lesley Pollock
Media Relations Manager
(01786) 467058

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Dr Laura Piacentini
University of Stirling

Stirling

FK9 4LA
Scotland

UK

telephone

Tel: +44 (0) 1786 467982


A Weekend of Lindsay Anderson at the MacRobert

Date released: Monday 4 April 2005

The University of Stirling holds the personal and working papers, diaries, photographs and memorabilia of Lindsay Anderson, one of the most important British film directors of the twentieth century. This weekend (8 – 10 April) the MacRobert will screen three of Anderson’s films to mark the opening of an exhibition of photographs and memorabilia from the Lindsay Anderson Collection in the University’s Pathfoot building.

The films, If…. (1968), O Lucky Man! (1973) and Britannia Hospital (1982) all star Malcolm McDowell and are often referred to as the ‘Mick Travis trilogy’ (after the name of the character McDowell plays in all three). They are Anderson’s comments on the state of Britain as he saw it, films full of anger, energy and invention. The actor and director Brian Pettifer will introduce If…. Brian appeared in all three films being screened and will be familiar to many from the BBC Scotland series Rab C Nesbitt.

Karl Magee, archivist for the Lindsay Anderson Collection, will introduce the other two films providing a unique insight into their production by drawing on Anderson’s diaries and working papers.

Friday 8 April 8.15 pm
If…
If…is probably Lindsay Anderson’s most well-known and successful film. Starring Malcolm McDowell in his first major film role it is a lyrical tale of teenage rebellion set in an English public school. Filmed at Cheltenham College, where Anderson was a pupil in the 1930s, the harsh brutalities and rigid structure of public school mirror the wider inequalities of British society. The iconic image of McDowell, machine-gun blazing, at the end of the film resonated with an audience bombarded with images of protest during the student riots of 1968. The film won the Palm D’Or at the 1969 Cannes Film Festival and established Anderson as one of the leading British film directors of the time. We're really pleased that he has agreed to take part - looks like its going to be a great evening!

Saturday 9 April 8.15 pm
O Lucky Man!
Anderson followed the success of If… with an epic road movie full of wit and invention. O Lucky Man! follows the picaresque adventures of Mick Travis, the namesake of the rebellious schoolboy in If… Travis begins the film as a travelling coffee salesman embarking on a journey during which he encounters a myriad of characters including mad scientists, shadowy bureaucrats, big businessmen, the Salvation Army and violent tramps. The film tackles a range of subjects including medical experimentation, local corruption, the ethics of big business and urban poverty. Anderson himself appears in the film on a number of occasions, most notably in the final scene where, at an audition for roles in the film, he strikes McDowell across the face with a copy of the script.

Sunday 10 April 8.15 pm
Britannia Hospital
In 1981 Anderson abandoned a number of Hollywood projects to return to Britain to make Britannia Hospital, the final part of the ‘Mick Travis trilogy’. The film is a blistering satire on the state of Britain in the 1980s. It takes place in a hospital preparing for a royal visit to celebrate its 500th anniversary. Preparations are hampered by the presence of demonstrators outside the hospital gates (outraged at the presence of an African dictator inside) and within the hospital staff threaten industrial action. Meanwhile, an investigative journalist prowls the building and a professor works secretly on a mysterious project. Critically savaged on its original release (during the Falklands War) Britannia Hospital is perhaps Anderson’s most unfairly neglected work and is ripe for reappraisal.

To book call the MacRobert on (01786) 466666 or log onto: www.macrobert.org. For further information on the Lindsay Anderson collection see: www.library.stir.ac.uk/lindsayanderson.


Lesley Pollock
Media Relations Manager
(01786) 467058

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Karl Magee
University of Stirling

Stirling

FK9 4LA
Scotland

UK

telephone

Tel: +44 (0) 1786 466619


Marketing Can be Used to Benefit Public Health


Date released: Tuesday 5 April 2005

 

Can marketing, the force that has driven our love affair with cigarettes and fast food, really be used to improve public health? Professor Gerard Hastings, Director of the University of Stirling and the Open University’s new Institute for Social Marketing, will argue that it can in his inaugural lecture on Wednesday 6 April.

Professor Hastings said: “If tobacco companies can use marketing to hook us on cigarettes and fast food companies can market a billion burgers a day, then public health can use it to reverse this tide. Commercial marketers make their profits by influencing our behaviour – by getting us to wear these trainers or eat that chocolate bar. They do this by understanding us as consumers, rewarding our loyalty and making us feel good about ourselves. Social marketers can use the same methods to influence, not our consumption, but our health behaviours – what we eat and drink, how much exercise we take and so on.”

According to Professor Hastings, social marketing has enormous potential to do good given that more than fifty percent of premature deaths are attributable to lifestyle choices.

The lecture, entitled Marketing Health: Opportunity, Threat or just Oxymoron?, will be given at the University of Stirling on Wednesday 6 April at 5.30pm in the Logie Lecture Theatre.

Lesley Pollock
Media Relations Manager
(01786) 467058

For further information or to arrange an interview contact:

 
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Professor Gerard Hastings
University of Stirling

Stirling

FK9 4LA
Scotland

UK

telephone

Tel: +44 (0) 1786 467393


80-Year-Old Graduate Vows to Carry on Learning

Tom Clifford
Pictured above:  Tom Clifford on Graduation day.


Date released: Tuesday 5 April 2005

 

Sprightly Stirling man Tom Clifford has fulfilled a life-long goal in graduating from the University of Stirling – at the age of 80.

Mr Clifford, a gunner during the 1944 Normandy Landings, graduated with a BSc in Psychology in March.

“I left school at 14 without any qualifications and worked in a butcher’s shop and bakery before joining the navy when I was 18. I left the services at 22, by which time I was married with a young child so going to University was not an option. I took a series of factory jobs, everything from making cast iron baths to bicycles before my desire to travel took me overseas to India, Nigeria, Sierra Leone and Sri Lanka to work,” said Tom.

Tom had his first taste of further education when he studied for his City and Guild’s certificate in Foundry Practice at Stow College, Glasgow in his early twenties. He did not return to education until he was 52 when he began, but never finished, a degree at Manchester University in Industrial Education and Training.

A planned move to Spain to be with his daughter and her family after the death of his first wife Elizabeth, spurred Tom on to apply for a degree in Spanish at the University of Stirling.

“My hearing wasn’t great after the war and working in factories, so I had to abandon my initial plans. Instead I focussed on Psychology, as I’d always been interested in behaviourism in the workplace. I am sure some of my fellow students thought I was an ‘old duffer’, but most of them valued my life experience. I never did make it to the students’ union though!”

Tom is determined to carry on learning. He is planning to return to the University this September with his second wife Anula (44).

“I might even start a Master’s,” said Tom, “even if I don’t live to finish it!”

Lesley Pollock
Media Relations Manager
(01786) 467058

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Thomas Clifford
University of Stirling

Stirling

FK9 4LA
Scotland

UK

telephone

Tel: +44 (0) 1786 462478


The Principal’s Music


Date released: Wednesday 13 April 2005

The University of Stirling continues its series of informal lunchtime musical recitals, entitled The Principal’s Music, with a performance by Strathallan School Chapel Choir and Chamber Choir on Wednesday 27 April 2005 at 12.15 - 1.00 pm in the foyer of the MacRobert Arts Centre.

The choir will sing a selection of sacred and secular songs. Admission is free and members of the public are most welcome.

If you have any queries please contact the External Relations on Tel: (01786) 467055 or Email: c&d@stir.ac.uk.

Lesley Pollock
Media Relations Manager
(01786) 467058

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Khlayre Mullin

Development and Events Manager
University of Stirling

Stirling

FK9 4LA
Scotland

UK

telephone

Tel: +44 (0) 1786 466675


Stirling Expert Joins Corporate Homicide Group

Date released: Tuesday 19 April 2005

University of Stirling Criminology lecturer, Dr Dave Whyte has joined a Scottish Executive expert group set up to review the law in Scotland on corporate liability for culpable homicide.

The group will submit a report to the Justice Minister by the summer.

Dr Whyte said: "The vast majority of deaths at work are not accidents, but are wholly avoidable.  Many people die directly as a result of serious breaches of the law, yet not one director or company in Scotland has ever been convicted of the offence of corporate homicide.  A new law which closes the loophole is urgently required."

Dr Whyte’s research interests focus upon the domestic and international regulation of corporate crime, with a particular interest in workplace safety crimes.  

Lesley Pollock

Media Relations Manager

(01786) 467058

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Dr Dave Whyte
University of Stirling

Stirling

FK9 4LA
Scotland

UK

telephone

Tel: +44 (0) 1786 466429
07952 268598


MSPs Learn about Good Practice at Stirling

Date released: Tuesday 19 April 2005

The Scottish Parliament’s Equal Opportunities Committee will visit the University of Stirling today (Tuesday) as part of a tour of Scotland to discuss issues surrounding barriers to participation faced by disabled people.

Students and staff will share examples of Stirling’s good practice with

MSPs Cathie Peattie, Convener of the Committee, and Marilyn Livingstone.

Disability Adviser, Catriona Mowat said: “The University has taken a holistic approach to supporting and enabling students, which aims to remove a wide range of barriers to learning and participation in student life. We are looking forward to discussing a range of issues with the MSPs and sharing examples of where we believe we offer good practice. This includes provision we have made to assist students to become effective independent learners through equipping all computer labs in the University with a wide range of enabling technologies and the availability of study skills support.  We will also highlight the success of a pilot benefits advice service for disabled students, which has been unique to Stirling University and was itself the subject of a previous visit by members of the Scottish Executive.”

The University offers pre-entry personal advisory visits, a personal learning assistant scheme and a holistic Student Information & Support Service incorporating disability, financial and welfare advice, as well as counselling.

It has also developed an integrated teaching and learning environment which promotes independent studying practices for in-house or distance learning students regardless of any disability. All computer labs at the University contain a wide range of enabling technologies from screen readers and screen magnification for visually impaired students, to scan and read back software with enhanced interactive spelling and proofing tools for students with specific learning difficulties.

In May 2004 the University won a prestigious best practice award for its supportive approach to students with special needs. The accolade, bestowed by University and Colleges Information Systems Association, recognises the University’s commitment to widening access for students with disabilities through the provision of specialist IT facilities.

Lesley Pollock

Media Relations Manager

(01786) 467058

 
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Catriona Mowat
University of Stirling

Stirling

FK9 4LA
Scotland

UK

telephone

Tel: +44 (0) 1786 467080
07952 268598


Wanted: Your Views on Cancer Services

Date released: Wednesday 20 April 2005

The University of Stirling’s Cancer Care Research Centre (CCRC) would like to hear from anyone in or around Stornoway with experience of cancer, either as a patient, family member, friend or carer.

The Centre, which was set up in October 2003 to find out more about the experiences of people affected by cancer, is looking for people to take part in new Patient and Carer Advisory Groups that will inform cancer treatment and care in Scotland.

Deputy Director of CCRC, Dr Allison Worth said: “Getting involved with the Cancer Care Research Centre to talk about your experiences and views is a great way of getting your voice heard and making a real difference. Your views will influence the kind of research we do. Together, we can influence how services are developed and help other people affected by cancer.”

It is hoped that the Patient and Carer Advisory Groups will meet once every 3 months or so. The groups will be helped in their discussions by one of the research team.

Allison Worth said: “You don’t need any qualifications, special skills or medical knowledge to take part. The most valuable thing you bring is your experience, both good and bad, and your willingness to share your views and experiences with others. Some people will be involved in groups for up to two years or more, but you don’t need to make that kind of commitment. See how you feel and if you want you can pull out at any time, you can. If you can’t make a particular meeting we will be happy to see you the next time.”

If you would like to help, you can find out more by logging onto: www.cancercare.stir.ac.uk You can also call Allison Worth or Neneh Rowa-Dewar on 01786 849260 or E-mail: cancercare@stir.ac.uk for further information.

Lesley Pollock

Media Relations Manager

(01786) 467058

For further information:

 
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Allison Worth or Neneh Rowa-Dewar
University of Stirling

Stirling

FK9 4LA
Scotland

UK

telephone

Tel: +44 (0) 1786 849260


Deep Down Scots Want To Be Environmentally Friendly

Date released: Thursday 21 April 2005

Scottish decision-makers are not doing enough to encourage environmentally friendly behaviour, according to a new study by University of Stirling postgraduate student Anne Winther.

The survey of around 250 MSPs, local councillors, statutory organisations, business and NGO leaders and academics, found that decision-makers care about the environment but drastically underestimate the Scottish public’s level of concern and need to do more to remove barriers to pro-environmental living.

Anne said: “This difference between actual and estimated general public concerns may have arisen due to decision-makers basing their responses on their observations of Scot’s actual anti-environmental behaviour, rather than on their hidden underlying pro-environmental attitudes and concerns. The paradoxical difference between pro-environmental attitude and society’s predominantly anti-environmental behaviour can be explained by socio-psychological factors moderating behaviour. For example, most people are concerned about pollution, but may not recycle waste. This was the case in 2003 in Stirling with 94% of waste going to landfill, but, since Stirling Council made recycling easy by giving householders recycling bins, there has been a dramatic four fold increase in the amount of recycled waste and almost all households recycling. Decision-makers must identify and focus on removing barriers which prevent pro-environmental behaviour and make environmentally friendly activities easier.”

Anne believes that decision-makers should act as role models for the rest of society and incorporate principles of ecology into their decision-making:

“Leaders have a role to play in providing a framework to help people overcome the barriers that prevent pro-environmental behaviour. Scottish decision-makers are not fully prepared to take the lead in championing the environment and implementing true sustainable development,” said Anne, “the first start is for leaders to act pro-environmentally themselves.”

Environmental risks often go unrecognised, despite the fact they are increasing. “For example, the increased risk of flooding in parts of Scotland requires affirmative action by decision-makers in order to safeguard the public from these risks”, said Ian Moffatt, Anne’s MSc supervisor.

The survey of decision-makers also found:

  • 92 percent are worried about wildlife extinction and loss of natural habitats.
  • 94 percent think at least some negative environmental impact will be felt in Scotland within 50 years.
  • 75 percent believe that nature cannot cope with industrial development.

Anne was last year’s SEPA prize-winner for best student on the MSc in Environmental Management programme.

Lesley Pollock

Media Relations Manager

(01786) 467058

For further information:

 
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Anne Winther
University of Stirling

Stirling

FK9 4LA
Scotland

UK

telephone

Tel: 07791840261

 
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Dr Ian Moffatt
University of Stirling

Stirling

FK9 4LA
Scotland

UK

telephone

Tel: +44 (0) 1786 467854


Independent Audit Under the Spotlight

Date released: Friday 22 April 2005

Professor Ian Fraser of the Department of Accounting, Finance and Law will deliver his Inaugural Lecture – Does effective corporate governance imply independent audit? – on Wednesday 4 May 2005 at 5.30 pm in Logie Lecture Theatre.

Professor Fraser said: “Major corporate failures worldwide such as Enron and Worldcom emphasise the need for effective structures of corporate governance. It is generally argued that independent audit is a vital component of effective governance. But there are major problems with this. A critical evaluation of the concept of the independent auditor suggests that it has become reliant on the concept of economic man – a self-interested amoral character. This suggests major ethical problems for a profession that is avowedly been concerned with a moral search for truth. And there are more practical difficulties. Too much independence may lead to disengagement from the underlying realities of organizations. A review of contemporary audits suggests that there may be a conflict between audit competence and audit independence. There may be the need for a new audit paradigm in which an emphasis on integrity is juxtaposed with an acknowledgement of the reality of interdependence.”

The lecture is free and open to the public. Please RSVP to the External Relations, tel: 01786 467055 or e-mail: c&d@stir.ac.uk

Lesley Pollock
Media Relations Manager
(01786) 467058

For further information:

 
contact us > > >
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Khlayre Mullin
University of Stirling

Stirling

FK9 4LA
Scotland

UK

telephone

Tel: +44 (0) 1786 466675


Stirling's Marketing Comes Up Trumps

Pictured above:  Judith Gray receives one of her two awards at the ceremony in Leeds.

Date released: Friday 22 April 2005

The University of Stirling has triumphed in the annual Heist Awards for Education Marketing. Stirling saw off competition from almost 100 UK Higher and Further Education institutions to win good practice awards for its 2005 Undergraduate Prospectus and its Student Recruitment CD ROM.

Publications Manager, Mrs Judith Gray said: “The University is delighted to receive these awards as they recognise our achievements in producing marketing materials that appeal to a broad number of students. The awards are judged by our peers and we are competing with other universities and colleges throughout the UK, so the competition couldn’t be stiffer. ”

In commending Stirling’s prospectus the judges praised the publication’s mix of student, campus and lifestyle shots, ease of navigation and consistent layout. They particularly liked sections such as ‘Why choose Stirling’, ‘Did you know’ and ‘Graduate Viewpoint’. They were equally impressed by the CD ROM’s imagery and well chosen student interviews as well its accessibility – it has a visually impaired option and uses software that works on PCs of all ages.

Director of Communications & Development, Mr Giles Dove said: “Our recruitment materials reflect the fact that the University of Stirling is a great place to live and learn. Our reputation for high quality research and teaching and our unique campus setting make Stirling the first choice for an increasing number of students from both the UK and overseas.”

Lesley Pollock
Media Relations Manager
(01786) 467058


Stirling Student Makes £3.5k for Red Cross

Date released: Tuesday 26 April 2005

 

The British Red Cross is thrilled that a student volunteering for work experience has raised nearly £3,500 for the Red Cross’s work with vulnerable people in the Stirling area.

University of Stirling student, Caitlin McNamarra approached the British Red Cross fundraising department for work experience during her January break from studies.  Caitlin, who is in the second year of a marketing and business degree, was keen to gain some practical experience in event management.

Under guidance and supervision from the Red Cross’ fundraising team, Caitlin organised a corporate white water rafting challenge on the River Tay. The event raised a staggering £3500, which will be used to run Red Cross services in and around Stirling.

Elizabeth Gunn, Senior Fundraiser with the Red Cross, said: “Caitlin managed every aspect of the project – the promotion, advertising and branding, organising the day itself, then analysing and evaluating the event. The standard of work she produced was quite outstanding. The money she raised will be valuable in helping us work with local people in crisis.”

Speaking of her experience, Caitlin said: “The white water rafting event was a great experience, and really allowed me to put into action what I’ve been learning about at University. It’s also a brilliant thing to have on my CV – and something I am really proud of.”

Practical work experience placements can be arranged for students and graduates through the British Red Cross at any time of the year, or as a unit during term time through the University of Stirling Careers Advisory Service’s ‘Community Service Learning Placement’. 

For more information please contact the British Red Cross on 01324 679 068, or Stirling University Careers Advisory Service on 01786 467 070.

Lesley Pollock

Media Relations Manager

(01786) 467058


Rwandan Scholarship Scheme

Date released: Tuesday 26 April 2005

Ten Scottish universities are offering scholarship places to Rwandan women this year as the latest stage of a remarkable project which has already helped revitalize education in the African country.

The Rotary University Scholarship Scheme, Rwanda (RUSSR), is organised by Gerda Siann, Professor Emeritus in Gender Relations at the University of Dundee.

In the academic year 2003-04, seven Rwandan women benefited from the programme. This year that number is set to grow significantly with ten Scottish universities now offering openings. The universities involved are Dundee, Edinburgh, Glasgow Caledonian, St Andrews, Stirling, Aberdeen, Abertay, Glasgow, Heriot Watt and Strathclyde. In all, eleven places are being made available to Rwandan women.

Study fees are waived by the universities to make it easier for the Rwandan women to come and study in Scotland. The Ministry of Education in Rwanda pays living costs. Rotary International links each student with a supporting family and helps handle the financial and organizational arrangements.

Professor Siann, who recently visited Rwanda, said: "In the two years since I was last in the country the progress in social, economic and educational areas has been most impressive. Everybody I spoke to in Rwanda told me of their optimism for the future in Rwanda and many particularly in the Ministry of Education expressed their thanks to the universities of Scotland in contributing to this."

The scholarship scheme was set up as a registered charity to further the education of Rwandan women and contribute to capacity building in a country which had been devastated by genocide. With the general population having been decimated by the loss of so many men in the conflict, the education of girls and women in Rwanda has become critical to maintaining the country's redevelopment.

Lesley Pollock
Media Relations Manager
(01786) 467058